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Chiropractic for Children and Babies

Chiropractic for Children and Babies



When people ask why babies or children need to see a chiropractor, the answer is simple! Everyone has a spine and EVERYONE can benefit from an optimally functioning nervous system. Children often find improvement from issues such as torticollis, reflux, colic, constipation, asthma, and more. ”Is chiropractic safe for children?” YES, chiropractic is completely safe, gentle, and effective for children! The doctors at Markson Chiropractic take their time with each child and parent to fully explain their analysis and answer any questions before they perform the first adjustment. Chiropractic is not all about neck and back pain (a common misconception!), but helping your body function better and feel better, without drugs or surgery! December 01, 2014/Dr. Tokar/Comment Chiropractic Care, Children and Babies chiropractic care for kids, chiropractic for children, chiropractic treatment for kids, chiropractic for babies Dr. Tokar What is Chiropractic?Our PracticeMeet Our DoctorsMeet Our StaffCustomer TestimonialsServices & Techniques/Real Healthcare/New Patient Information/ Markson Chiropractic is an intergrated chiropractic practice oriented toward family and pediatric care, athletic and motor vehicle injuries, worker's compensation cases, preventative health care, spinal decompression, and alternative primary care. We use state of the art technology and the latest diagnostic methods to determine if yours is a chiropractic case. “The staff is incredibly friendly and helpful and the doctors are amazing. I leave every session with a little more spring in my step.” “Excellent care and spinal adjustment. I wouldn’t be walking around and feeling as great if not for Markson Chiropractic!”

 

https://www.amplifeied.com/post/chiropractic-children-and-babies/e96c24da-2834-4a04-95dd-612ada635ad2
 


Second, thousands of people undergo back surgery every year for back pain, putting their bodies at risk for surgical complications. Third, chiropractic and other conservative, nonsurgical treatment methods have been shown to be effective for uncomplicated cases of LBP.

And here's one more important fact: Research suggests the big problem with surgery for back pain, particularly chronic back pain (recurrent pain over weeks or months), is that it doesn't seem to work – at least not any better than conservative care. The latest evidence: study findings published in the research journal Spine that found: "After an average of 11 years follow-up, there was no difference in patient self-rated outcomes between fusion and multidisciplinary cognitive-behavioral and exercise rehabilitation for cLBP (chronic low-back pain).

The results suggest that, given the increased risks of surgery and the lack of deterioration in nonoperative outcomes over time, the use of lumbar fusion in cLBP patients should not be favored in health care systems where multidisciplinary cognitive-behavioral and exercise rehabilitation programs are available."

This isn't the first study to suggest surgery isn't your best option when it comes to the back. And if you think you can go to any type of doctor, think again. Expertise aside, research indicates that the type of doctor you visit first – namely a surgeon vs. a doctor of chiropractic – can essentially determine whether you'll eventually undergo surgery. So think surgery last and visit a chiropractor first. Your back will thank you for it.

 

http://www.toyourhealth.com/mpacms/tyh/article.php?id=2060

For more information please contact Dr. Tariq Ahmed at (630) 295-8851

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[header] => The Problem With Surgery for Low Back Pain [summary] =>

By Editorial Staff


If you've ever experienced back pain, whether acute or chronic, there are a few facts you should know. First, you're not alone; studies suggest 80 percent of adults experience at least one episode of low back pain in their lifetime. 

Second, thousands of people undergo back surgery every year for back pain, putting their bodies at risk for surgical complications. Third, chiropractic and other conservative, nonsurgical treatment methods have been shown to be effective for uncomplicated cases of LBP.

And here's one more important fact: Research suggests the big problem with surgery for back pain, particularly chronic back pain (recurrent pain over weeks or months), is that it doesn't seem to work – at least not any…

[excerpt] => By Editorial StaffIf you've ever experienced back pain, whether acute or chronic, there are a few facts you should know. First, you're not alo [image] => [author] => [authorid] => 0 [clientid] => 364 [categories] => Array ( ) [guid] => 5637ea5b74540000001 [unix_timestamp] => 1418349375 ) 1 -->

The Problem With Surgery for Low Back Pain

By Editorial Staff


If you've ever experienced back pain, whether acute or chronic, there are a few facts you should know. First, you're not alone; studies suggest 80 percent of adults experience at least one episode of low back pain in their lifetime. 

Second, thousands of people undergo back surgery every year for back pain, putting their bodies at risk for surgical complications. Third, chiropractic and other conservative, nonsurgical treatment methods have been shown to be effective for uncomplicated cases of LBP.

And here's one more important fact: Research suggests the big problem with surgery for back pain, particularly chronic back pain (recurrent pain over weeks or months), is that it doesn't seem to work – at least not any better than conservative care. The latest evidence: study findings published in the research journal Spine that found: "After an average of 11 years follow-up, there was no difference in patient self-rated outcomes between fusion and multidisciplinary cognitive-behavioral and exercise rehabilitation for cLBP (chronic low-back pain).

The results suggest that, given the increased risks of surgery and the lack of deterioration in nonoperative outcomes over time, the use of lumbar fusion in cLBP patients should not be favored in health care systems where multidisciplinary cognitive-behavioral and exercise rehabilitation programs are available."

This isn't the first study to suggest surgery isn't your best option when it comes to the back. And if you think you can go to any type of doctor, think again. Expertise aside, research indicates that the type of doctor you visit first – namely a surgeon vs. a doctor of chiropractic – can essentially determine whether you'll eventually undergo surgery. So think surgery last and visit a chiropractor first. Your back will thank you for it.

 

http://www.toyourhealth.com/mpacms/tyh/article.php?id=2060

For more information please contact Dr. Tariq Ahmed at (630) 295-8851

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

'Tis the Season to Stay in Shape: Holiday Eating Do's and Don'ts

OK, let's assume – which may be a big assumption – you've made it through Thanksgiving weekend safe and sound. That means you enjoyed family, friendship and a few holiday treats, but didn't gorge yourself into oblivion. 


Great job; considering how many people give in (to put it lightly) to temptation when faced with a holiday feast, you're to be commended.

Now comes the hard part. You see, Thanksgiving was the first of what promises to be a smorgasbord of dessert-laden events to round out the year. Company party? Yep, you're going. Dinner with the family? Check. New Year's Eve, New Year's Day and various happenings in between? You've already RSVP'd. Here's how to avoid packing on the pounds this month as the holiday festivities continue with a few do's and don'ts to consider.

Don't eat more than you usually do. If there's one thing you've learned during this process of losing weight and getting in better shape, it's that you're in this for the long haul. The holiday season isn't an excuse to abandon the healthy lifestyle you've cultivated all year, so don't sacrifice your good eating habits now. Fill a plate and eat until you're satisfied. Overeat and you'll end up feeling guilty and sick to your stomach – a bad combination.

Do enjoy a few treats here and there. You may not be eating more than usual, but that doesn't mean you should avoid your favorite treats when they rear their delectable heads this holiday season. Healthy eating is moderate eating; it's just as unhealthy at one extreme vs. the other. Turn December into a dessert month and you'll pay the price; but swear off treats altogether and you'll increase your risk of falling off the wagon.

Don't let a few "bad" meals spoil your month. Let's say you've ignored #1 and #2 above, meaning you've eating too much at a holiday party, and most of what you ate was high-fat, high-sugar, high-carb or all of the above. No problem; don't let a few unhealthy eating moments spoil your long-term health and wellness goals. No matter how busy your holiday season, you have many more days to eat healthy than unhealthy if you prioritize the former over the latter.

Do bring your own dish to the party. You want to stay on the straight and narrow, but dread going to a party and facing table after table of nutrient-deficient, calorie-packed items. What to do? Help out the host and do yourself a service by bringing a healthy side dish or appetizer with you. If nothing else, you'll be able to supplement what's there with your offering to ensuring a healthier meal.

Don't bring home leftovers. We rationalize that we're helping the host out by bringing home a few containers of leftovers, but all we're really doing is ensuring the next day (and the day after that) are just as unhealthy as party day was. Enjoy the meal and then let it go; get back to your healthy ways and let someone else fill their fridge with a week's worth of bad eating habits.

Do think about the big picture. Healthy eating isn't a phase, a step or a short-term goal; it's a lifestyle that pays dividends you can see and feel. You've dedicated 11 months to fulfilling this promise to yourself, so why throw it all away now? Think of the holiday season as just another opportunity to make sensible choices about your health. Before you know it, 2015 will be here and you'll be stronger, fitter and thankful that you stuck to your guns for another year.

 

http://www.toyourhealth.com/mpacms/tyh/article.php?id=2062

For more information please contact Dr. Tariq Ahmed at (630) 295-8851